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Carver Park by Dr. Lynda J. Mubarak

26 Feb

CARVER PARK by Dr. Lynda J. Mubarak
Carver Park is a children’s non-fiction book appropriate for grades 2 – 4.

It would seem that growing up in segregated Waco, Texas in the 1950s would be filled with challenges and disappointments for any African-American child, but little Lynda Jones learned everything about the world near and far from her beloved books and the travels of her father during WWII.

Carver Park gives us a view into the life of one child who found that regardless of society’s circumstances, the people in our lives provide us with the knowledge and support required to learn and succeed in a time of great social unrest and historical change.

 

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EXCERPT:  Carver Park by Dr. Lynda J. Mubarak

Mama worked at a Catholic hospital in Waco for many years. During one particular year the hospital was crowded with adults and children with a disease called Polio. One day she said, “The nuns wanted to know if you would demonstrate how an Iron Lung works during the Heart of Texas Fair and I told them yes!” When I inquired about an Iron Lung Daddy described it very slowly. “An iron lung is a machine that breathes for you when your lungs are too tired and weak to do their job. People with Polio need extra help in order to breathe.”

One day nurses came to our school and everyone in our school was given the Polio vaccine. Mama explained, “Everyone in the hospital including the doctors and nurses had to take the vaccination to keep from catching the disease. And, everyone in our country must take the vaccine.” It was a very scary time in America and I was waiting for the fair day!

On the day of the fair Mama dressed me in my best night gown. The nurses put me in the iron lung and put a pillow under my head. The fair visitors walked by and stared at me through the glass windows of the machine, which looked like a big shiny spaceship. I wanted to see how the iron lung worked so I held my breath, but the machine pulled the breath right out of my body and pushed air right back in. It was like magic! I really felt important. I was the only African American kid in the fair that year!

( Continued… )

 

Purchase CARVER PARK by Dr. Lynda J. Mubarak
https://www.amazon.com/Carver-Park-Lynda-Jones-Mubarak/dp/162676851X
Children’s Books > Geography & Cultures > Where We Live > City Life

 

 


 

Intimate Conversation with Dr. Lynda J. Mubarak

Dr. Lynda Jones Mubarak is a native Texan and was raised in Waco and Fort Worth, Texas. She is a retired special education teacher, facilitator and a US Army veteran. She has served as a private school administrator, adjunct writing and ESL professor, and is currently a co-host of The Author’s Lounge Radio Show at Fish Bowl Radio Network.

Dr. Lynda is a graduate of P.L. Dunbar High School, received her BS in Elementary Education from Texas Christian University, MEd in Elementary Education from Texas Wesleyan University, and EdD from Nova Southeastern University.

She enjoys reading, crossword puzzles, and traveling with her husband, Kairi, and their two rescue dogs; Ebony Joyce and Shorty Junior. Always a lover of books as a child, Dr. Lynda decided to follow her dream of becoming an author of children’s books after retirement. Dr. Lynda is currently working on her third book.

BPM: What made you want to become a writer?
I’ve always wanted to become a writer, but never discussed it with anyone. I have probably been writing mentally all my life, but didn’t begin putting my thoughts on paper until about 10 years ago.

BPM: How do you think you’ve evolved creatively?
I don’t second guess myself as much during my writing now. If I think about a story plot, I let it flow and work out the flaws later.

BPM: Do you view writing as a kind of spiritual practice?
Yes, writing is very spiritual because it is very personal. Your story is yours and it involves all your senses and emotions.

BPM: How has writing impacted your life?
I’m finding stories in the most interesting places and circumstances. I’m either writing or thinking about writing. If I have an idea and go the keyboard, the story will develop little by little.

BPM: How do you find or make time to write? Are you a plotter or panster?
I usually write between 1:30 am – 6:30 am. I think writing is sometimes spontaneous, but you must also have a personal schedule to remain focused. I’m a panster. I don’t plan anything.

BPM: How did you choose the genre you write in? Have you considered writing in another genre?
I chose children’s books because I was a special education teacher and college adjunct for many years. I would like to write a crime fiction book. I love solving mysteries!

BPM: Tell us about your book for young readers, Carver Park.
Carver Park is a children’s non-fiction book appropriate for grades 2 – 4.

It would seem that growing up in segregated Waco, Texas in the 1950s would be filled with challenges and disappointments for any African-American child, but little Lynda Jones (me) learned everything about the world near and far from her beloved books and the travels of her father during WWII.

Carver Park gives us a view into the life of one child who found that regardless of society’s circumstances, the people in our lives provide us with the knowledge and support required to learn and succeed in a time of great social unrest and historical change.

BPM: Give us some insight into your main character. What makes each one so special?
The main character/speaker in Carver Park is Lynda Jones (myself) as a young child. She recalls her early years with her family and how her parents taught her about the world near and far. Each memory is special because it is mini-story of an event or family discussion.

BPM: What was your hardest scene to write?
The close was the most difficult because the memories kept coming, but you have to stop at some point or the book will never end.

BPM: Share one point in your book that resonated with your present journey.
The experience with the Iron Lung was special to me when I think of current portable breathing devices used by people in their homes and in public. You are no longer restricted to one area if you have a respiratory challenge.

BPM: Is there a specific place/space/state that you find inspiration in?
My visits to Cuba, Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic inspire me because the people of these islands have huge personal, health and welfare challenges unknown to most of us. In the same manner, I am also moved by the homeless families in America who suffer under the same circumstances in a country that has so much.

BPM: Do you want each book to stand on its on or do you prefer to write series?
I would like for each book to stand on its on and deliver its specific message.

BPM: Does writing energize you?
Writing has always been an energizer for me. It brings out something in you that you don’t always know existed.

BPM: Do you believe in writer’s block?
No. Some of the best selling authors have all explained that writer’s block is another term for distractions. If you are going to grow as an author, the distractions must be eliminated or ignored.

BPM: Is there one subject you would never write about as an author?
Not yet. I think if I ever change genres from children’s literature to a more mature genre, the taboos would probably emerge.

BPM: Have you written any other books that are not published?
Yes, I have two manuscripts with my publishers waiting. I’m excited about both! They are both appropriate for elementary school children and should be released in 2018.

BPM: How can readers discover more about you and your work?
Publisher: http://www.MelaninOrigins.com
Website: http://www.lyndamubarak.com
Stations Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lyndamubarak

 

Purchase CARVER PARK by Dr. Lynda J. Mubarak
https://www.amazon.com/Carver-Park-Lynda-Jones-Mubarak/dp/162676851X
https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/carver-park-lynda-jones-mubarak/1127493943?ean=9781626768512

 

 

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